Siri is our Climate Ambassador!

Siri Karavida, ESC volunteer at GEAI, is coming to the end of her volunteering year with us. The list of the things she managed to do while in Ireland is pretty impressive: Climate Action Days at schools, the household energy survey of Boyle, the Leitrim Cróga project (more on it soon!) and many more. However, amongst her main achievements she mentions becoming a Climate Ambassador.

What is Climate Ambassador?

The Climate Ambassador programme is a great opportunity to become a leader in your school, campus or community and to promote positive climate actions in a local context.

Climate change effects can be felt here and now, at a local, national and global scale. Becoming a Climate Ambassador gives people the opportunity and platform to do something really positive within our communities. Adapting to climate change and mitigating the adverse impacts is a growing concern in every community in Ireland.

Siri shares her experience

“My main action was delivering talks and presentations related to climate change in schools. It has been a very valuable experience, because I got the opportunity to talk about climate change to young students, who are the future active citizens and on whom the climate change will have the biggest impact. With my talks I reached about 140 people who were very engaged and interested. I faced some challenges regarding delivering the message of climate change without scaring and discouraging the students. I achieved that by finishing my talks with a positive message that there is still time and if we change our behaviour, climate change can be tackled. I was very surprised at the level of knowledge that the people already had on the issue, and the attention and engagement that they showed!”

If you are interested in becoming a Climate Ambassador, more information is available on the official website of the programme.

Alexandra Peralaika

A noisy St. Patrick’s Day!

We’ve been going to rehearsals with Samboeira, a samba band in Sligo, for a while now. It took us a few weeks to get ready for St. Patrick’s Day parade. It is very rewarding for beginners like us to be able to perform in a parade! 54516582_10216101433442383_6380833762623619072_o.jpg

The parade we participated in was in Kiltimagh, county Mayo. Lovely place, and we were even lucky with the weather – it rained for only a few seconds during the parade!

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Special thanks to our “cultural attaché” Del Thorogood, who always takes us out to cultural events!

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Alexandra Peralaika

EVS&GEAI Together!

GEAI in ‘Pay It Forward’ Competition

Pay it Forward concept means to respond a person’s kindness by being kind to someone else, if you get something, give something back!

This is the main idea of volunteering and also of the European Voluntary Service.

Leargas, the National Agency that deals with the Erasmus+ programmes in Ireland is celebrating 20 years of European Voluntary Service with a big competition meant to attract more organisation to host and send young people for EVS. There are prizes for the volunteers with the best ideas!

GEAI, as a hosting organisation, entered the competition with a video that we made in order to promote EVS and ourselves.

Lisandra, Cedric and Alice had the visit of Barry, a talented student in the visual arts. Together they filmed a video showing what it means to be part of EVS, what have we done during our year in Ireland and what have we learned.  Also you can also see from the point of view of the hosting organisation what it means.

We had a lot of fun filming and we now realise that it is not an easy job to be a star! It definitely was rewarding when we saw the final result. Please watch our short video below and tell us what you think.

And don’t forget, sharing is caring!

 

The Sun is here!

Sunday morning a new message on the phone: “Heat wave coming!” Wow! Good news!

Lets enjoy the good weather: shorts and short sleeves, where are you?

There is nothing better than enjoy the summer at our house, with a beautiful view of Lough Allen and of course an ice cream.

But suddenly I looked at my legs and realized how bad winter was. A foreigner looking Irish!

After a very sad winter that for me started in January, when I moved to Ireland, where my life was home-work and work-home and at 5pm it was already dark, now is the time to take advantage of the good weather and enjoy the brighter days (from 5am to 11pm).

A good opportunity to sunbathe properly for a week and probably in the bank holiday, as well! A big sunny weekend seems very promising. Probably a good opportunity to rent a kayak and sunbathe in the middle of Lough Allen!

But this is not all! 1st of June, International children’s day. It was a good opportunity for all the “children” in our organization to celebrate “the first day of summer” with a communal lunch outdoors! Some of them not so young in years, but certainly young at heart!

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A nature walk in Cladagh Glen – Fermanagh

^1A57165DCE87B458BF32BA66B4880E9D5A61CF21FB9CE1B8BD^pimgpsh_fullsize_distrLast Friday us volunteers went for a nature walk in Cladagh Glen Walk, located in Co. Fermanagh. It was a beautiful warm and sunny day and we had a great time!

It was a good opportunity to see some of the Irish spring flowers, such as bluebells and primroses, and surprisingly for me: wild garlic! Never heard about it, in my entire life! But, is very tasty and incredible beautiful! There was wild garlic all over Cladagh Glen. It changes the landscape, for sure, after 3 months of rain and clouds, all over Ireland. The green forest is being transformed by the spring colours, mainly blue (bluebells) and white (wild garlic) and is very impressive! Slowly we are getting the summer spirit! Longer nights, brighter days, colour and energy!

Wherever I go in Ireland, my reaction is always the same: “Wow! I don’t have words to describe this landscape!” In Cladagh Glen I had, again, one of those moments. Even me, from the Azores, I can say that I saw the most beautiful landscapes of my life in Ireland.

I never took so many beautiful pictures, as in Ireland. My family and friends are amazed with the Irish landscape and culture, and so am I.For me, the most beautiful scene was the Cascades waterfall. So stunning!  And of course a nice place for a group picture!

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But now, a bit of culture and curiosities:

  • Claddagh Glen

Claddagh Glen takes its name from the Cladagh river, which rises from Marble Arch Caves, below Cuilcagh Mountain. It is also part of the Marlbank National Nature.

  • Marble Arch Caves

It was a French cave explorer Edouard Alfred Martel, accompanied by a young Dublin born scientist named Lyster Jameson, who first ventured into the darkness of the cave in 1895.

  • Maggie’s Hole

The legend goes that a local young girl, called Maggie Duffy, was running down from the mountain and across the arch when she fell through the hole and into the river below. She was wearing wide, voluminous skirts, which opened like a parachute so she floated downwards and lived to tell the tale.

  • Bluebells

They are not protected under international law, such as CITES or the EU Habitats Directive, but they are protected under UK law.

In the end, it was a lovely sunny afternoon, a good opportunity to explore Cladagh Glen’s landscape and forest, with some cultural moments and fun with the GEAI team.

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