Volunteers explore Glencar valley and waterfall

After the end of our very fun last session with students in the Organic Centre we decided to have a bit of adventure and went to Glencar waterfall. Although it’s still February, it felt like real spring! We definitely missed sunny days like this.

DSC_0564.JPG

The waterfall is just fabulous. There is something very special in its sounds and smells, it made us feel full of energy and joy.

DSC_0593.JPG

DSC_0599.JPG

We can confidently recommend this place to anyone visiting Leitrim. The combination of mountains, water and green grass is breathtakingly beautiful.

DSC_0540.JPG

Being close to Sligo on such a nice day we couldn’t miss a chance to go to the beach. Strandhill looked stunning in the sunset light.

DSC_0679.JPG

DSC_0674.JPG

DSC_0688.JPG

At the end of this much needed getaway we could only say that we should do these little trips more often and explore the Irish nature to the fullest while we’re here.

Alexandra Peralaika

EXPLORING IRELAND: OUR VISIT TO SLIGO

Last weekend we, the Good Energies EVS volunteers, decided to visit Sligo. Two weeks ago we went to Strandhill but we hadn’t the opportunity to make a tour of the city and now that we have, we can say that we really enjoyed it!

Sligo is one of those cities where you can feel a special charm. People are lovely, always ready to help. We started our tour in The Model Arts Centre. There we got a kick out of an exhibition called “Fanned apart” which gave us a glimpse into women’s lives in the twentieth century. After that, the staff suggested a few interesting places to us in the city and they gave us a map.

calry-church-sligo

We visited Calry Church, the Old Abbey and we walked through the streets, which, after living in Leitrim for a month, seemed to us to be full of people!

kate-in-sligo

We enjoyed beautiful views of The Garavogue River sitting having a cup of coffee on the riverside and of course we ended up in Pennys to do some local shopping!

We had a great day and we will definitely come back soon.

My first view of the Atlantic Ocean.

ocean-4

It is easy to believe we are each waves
And forget we are also the ocean…
    Jon J.Muth

I come from Belarus which is a land-locked country and last week, I saw the Atlantic ocean for the first time.

With the other new EVS volunteers working with GEAI we visited Sligo and saw the ocean at Strandhill. For some, the ocean is familiar but for me it was a unique experience.  However, the feeling for everybody was almost the same. The feeling of admiration and excitement with the big waves crashing on the shore.

ocean-3

It was good weather, and we visited the shelly beach where thousands of shells lay on the sand.

 

People were walking along the shore with their dogs, surfers were out on the waves and all of this made a very special atmosphere.

 

The buildings – markets, restaurants and homes – have a style connected with the ocean especially with shells.

ocean-2

 

Even the Irish name of the city of Sligo, “Sligeach”, means “abounding in shells” or “shelly place”.

So it was really a great time for us. And we are looking forward to another visit to the city and to the ocean again.

Katsiaryna

GEAI supports “Unearthed” screenings

IMG_1448 copia

GEAI volunteers Santi, Olga and Irina with filmmaker Jolynn Minnaar 

Good Energies Alliance Ireland supported and attended the screenings of Unearthed documentary in Bellanaleck (Fermanagh) and Sligo. The GEAI EVS volunteers Irina, Olga and Santi set up the projector for the Fermanagh event.

Unearthed is a thought provoking and extremely well made documentary about fracking by Jolynn Minnaar, covering both the vulnerable and arid Karoo in South Africa, and the forgotten victims of fracking pollution in the US.

Both screenings were followed by a Q&A afterward with the filmmaker.

More pictures on Flickr.

Water supplies threatened by fracking

World Heritage Site

Marble Arch Caves

Fermanagh, Sligo, Leitrim and Cavan water supplies threatened by fracking

On this week, when the EU Energy Ministers are discussing unconventional gas in Europe, and Tamboran are planning to drill a 1,000m deep exploratory well in Fermanagh, a new danger from fracking in Ireland has come to light.  The water supplies of Counties Fermanagh, North Leitrim, South Donegal, North Cavan, North Sligo and Sligo Town, and the World Heritage Site at Marble Arch Caves would be under threat if hydraulic fracturing is used to extract gas from shales. This is a conclusion reached by GEAI hydrogeologist, Davide Galazzi.

 “We are playing with fire.  The shale layer where Tamboran is planning to use hydraulic fracturing is packed like a sandwich between two major aquifers, Ballyshannon Limestones and Dartry Limestones, providing water to the above areas. The Dartry Limestones are also the rock embedding the UNESCO World Heritage Site at Marble Arch, the world-wide importance of which cannot be over- emphasised.”

He warned that these aquifers could become contaminated in the process.  “During hydraulic fracturing, which uses millions of gallons of frack fluid containing toxic chemicals at high pressure, fractures (or cracks) are created in the shale to release the gas.  These fractures can go in any direction, downwards as well as upwards, and nobody can forecast how far they will travel.

In a situation where there is a very short distance between the shale and the limestone layers, a distance which is far less than the minimum threshold (700m) recommended by recent studies from the UK, there is a high risk of this fluid being forced into those aquifers during hydraulic fracturing.

In addition, the fracking area is extremely close to the locations of water supplies and actually on the shores of Lough Erne and Lough Gill, which provide water to the whole of County Fermanagh, North Leitrim, Sligo Town and surrounding villages.  There is no guarantee that water contaminated with fracking chemicals, heavy metals and volatile petroleum products could not make its way to the areas from which drinking water is sourced.”

 “We are very alarmed at this finding, which concludes that there is a high risk of contamination of the sources of our drinking water from fracking”, said Aedín McLoughlin, GEAI Director.  “The Ballyshannon and Dartry limestones extend throughout most of the licensed area.   Without any barriers between the shale layer and the limestones, these Regionally Important Aquifers are endangered by hydraulic fracturing.  The EU Water Framework Directive says that ‘Water is not a commercial product like any other, but rather, a heritage which must be protected, defended and treated as such’.  Where there is intense fracking, as is planned for Ireland, water contamination inevitably results.  We have a duty to our children and our children’s children to leave our surface and ground waters in as pure a state, or even better, than we find them.  Fracking must not be allowed to endanger that heritage.”

It is an offence to pollute groundwater under the Local Government (Water Pollution) Acts of 1977 and 1990.

COPYRIGHT

® All rights reserved to GEAI 2018