A nature walk in Cladagh Glen – Fermanagh

^1A57165DCE87B458BF32BA66B4880E9D5A61CF21FB9CE1B8BD^pimgpsh_fullsize_distrLast Friday us volunteers went for a nature walk in Cladagh Glen Walk, located in Co. Fermanagh. It was a beautiful warm and sunny day and we had a great time!

It was a good opportunity to see some of the Irish spring flowers, such as bluebells and primroses, and surprisingly for me: wild garlic! Never heard about it, in my entire life! But, is very tasty and incredible beautiful! There was wild garlic all over Cladagh Glen. It changes the landscape, for sure, after 3 months of rain and clouds, all over Ireland. The green forest is being transformed by the spring colours, mainly blue (bluebells) and white (wild garlic) and is very impressive! Slowly we are getting the summer spirit! Longer nights, brighter days, colour and energy!

Wherever I go in Ireland, my reaction is always the same: “Wow! I don’t have words to describe this landscape!” In Cladagh Glen I had, again, one of those moments. Even me, from the Azores, I can say that I saw the most beautiful landscapes of my life in Ireland.

I never took so many beautiful pictures, as in Ireland. My family and friends are amazed with the Irish landscape and culture, and so am I.For me, the most beautiful scene was the Cascades waterfall. So stunning!  And of course a nice place for a group picture!

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But now, a bit of culture and curiosities:

  • Claddagh Glen

Claddagh Glen takes its name from the Cladagh river, which rises from Marble Arch Caves, below Cuilcagh Mountain. It is also part of the Marlbank National Nature.

  • Marble Arch Caves

It was a French cave explorer Edouard Alfred Martel, accompanied by a young Dublin born scientist named Lyster Jameson, who first ventured into the darkness of the cave in 1895.

  • Maggie’s Hole

The legend goes that a local young girl, called Maggie Duffy, was running down from the mountain and across the arch when she fell through the hole and into the river below. She was wearing wide, voluminous skirts, which opened like a parachute so she floated downwards and lived to tell the tale.

  • Bluebells

They are not protected under international law, such as CITES or the EU Habitats Directive, but they are protected under UK law.

In the end, it was a lovely sunny afternoon, a good opportunity to explore Cladagh Glen’s landscape and forest, with some cultural moments and fun with the GEAI team.

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